BENEFITS HIDDEN WITHIN HOBBIES

As a society, we spend way too much time doing things we don’t like.

 

There’s only 24 hours in a day. We spend this time at jobs we hate, classes we hate, around people we hate. And at the end of the day, we’re generally too tired and stressed out to do the things we love, or have always wanted to try.

 

Especially with finals coming up, I hear it constantly. Personally, I’ve picked up crocheting, which is similar to knitting, and I constantly hear, “How do you have time for that? I could never do that, I’m too busy and stressed out.”

 

Here’s a little secret, I make time. I find the time between homework, classes, clubs and work to sit down for at least a half hour each day and work on a project that’s fun.

 

Why would I do that? You’re right in thinking crocheting isn’t productive. It won’t get me a job and it won’t look good on my resume. And it isn’t even a social activity.

 

However, it is de-stressing. Everyone needs something that will calm them, and help them unwind from the day. For some, that’s video games, TV, hitting the gym, or going for a run.

 

But what about things you’ve always wanted to try, but you thought you never had the time to do?

 

Maybe you have a thing for kung-fu movies, and have always wanted to try karate, but the idea of going to a dojo after classes just seems daunting.

 

While you may be tired and feel brain-dead after classes, signing up for some karate lessons may not be so bad. According to Harvard Men’s Health Watch, exercise is good for your overall mood. Karate is exercise, and if it’s something you’ve always wanted to try, now more than ever may be the time to go for it.

 

But what about if you’ve always wanted to try knitting, and just can’t justify taking the time to do it?

 

Science says the repetitive motions of knitting can actually relieve anxiety, according to a Huffington Post article.

 

Even if all you’ve ever wanted to try is to get some peace and quiet, you can do that, too.

 

As I mentioned last week, meditation is incredibly helpful in practicing mindfulness and living in the moment.

 

With finals just around the corner, it’s important to unstick yourself from your cozy corner in the library to simply breathe and do something fun. If you don’t, your stress levels will be through the roof and you’ll feel battered and bruised by the time finals actually come.

 

So take a moment to breathe, then try out that new activity you’ve always been interested in. It may be easier – and more beneficial – than you think.

 

As a society, we spend way too much time doing things we don’t like.

 

There’s only 24 hours in a day. We spend this time at jobs we hate, classes we hate, around people we hate. And at the end of the day, we’re generally too tired and stressed out to do the things we love, or have always wanted to try.

 

Especially with finals coming up, I hear it constantly. Personally, I’ve picked up crocheting, which is similar to knitting, and I constantly hear, “How do you have time for that? I could never do that, I’m too busy and stressed out.”

 

Here’s a little secret, I make time. I find the time between homework, classes, clubs and work to sit down for at least a half hour each day and work on a project that’s fun.

 

Why would I do that? You’re right in thinking crocheting isn’t productive. It won’t get me a job and it won’t look good on my resume. And it isn’t even a social activity.

 

However, it is de-stressing. Everyone needs something that will calm them, and help them unwind from the day. For some, that’s video games, TV, hitting the gym, or going for a run.

 

But what about things you’ve always wanted to try, but you thought you never had the time to do?

Ben Lombard, a freshman accounting major, takes the time to work on his guitar skills while still succeeding in his academics.  Emily Wiegand photos.
Ben Lombard, a freshman accounting major, takes the time to work on his guitar skills while still succeeding in his academics. Emily Wiegand photos.

 

Maybe you have a thing for kung-fu movies, and have always wanted to try karate, but the idea of going to a dojo after classes just seems daunting.

 

While you may be tired and feel brain-dead after classes, signing up for some karate lessons may not be so bad. According to Harvard Men’s Health Watch, exercise is good for your overall mood. Karate is exercise, and if it’s something you’ve always wanted to try, now more than ever may be the time to go for it.

 

But what about if you’ve always wanted to try knitting, and just can’t justify taking the time to do it?

 

Science says the repetitive motions of knitting can actually relieve anxiety, according to a Huffington Post article.

 

Even if all you’ve ever wanted to try is to get some peace and quiet, you can do that, too.

 

As I mentioned last week, meditation is incredibly helpful in practicing mindfulness and living in the moment.

 

With finals just around the corner, it’s important to unstick yourself from your cozy corner in the library to simply breathe and do something fun. If you don’t, your stress levels will be through the roof and you’ll feel battered and bruised by the time finals actually come.

 

So take a moment to breathe, then try out that new activity you’ve always been interested in. It may be easier – and more beneficial – than you think.

 

Kayla Lemay is a Comment staff writer. Email her at klemay@student.bridgew.edu or follow her on Twitter @klemay123.

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