Halloween Horror Review

Over the years we have seen horror evolve and morph itself into different mediums. This is a list of a few of my favorite modern horror films!

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

I’m not going to lie: I love this movie. Based off of the series of novels that I have no doubt most of you have read, the viewer is given a fresh take, where the stories featured within the original books serve as narrative threads within an new story that binds all of them together. With costumes worthy of a Guillermo Del Toro movie (which isn’t terribly surprising, as he has both story writing and producing credits for the film), it was a delight, if not a horrifying one, to see the creatures and monsters that once stalked the pages of a book that I was only able to read in full daylight brought to life on the screen.

If you read the books as a kid, then you need to watch this movie. I promise you won’t regret it.

 

Happy Death Day

This movie is what you get when you mix the plot of Groundhog Day with a dash of slasher, pour a little psychological thriller in, and a dump in several cups of dark humor and sarcasm. Telling the story of a young college student locked in a perpetual time loop, desperate to find her killer in order to resume her normal live, this movie is equal parts clever and funny, whilst also putting the audience in a state of constant tension.

Watch this if you’re a fan of Bill Murray comedies, but wish they had just a bit more murder.

 

Halloween Kills

As much as I hate to say it, this movie did not live up to the expectations set by its predecessor, which came out in 2018. Consisting of several dully composed shots and stilted acting on the part of some of the supporting actors. (including a very awkward line delivery on the part of Lonnie’s actor in one scene) it committed the worst sin of cinema: it was boring. Not much happens, the status quo doesn’t really change, and in the end it’s just another disappointing sequel in a long line of disappointing sequels to classic ‘70s and ‘80s slasher films.

But hey, at least it’s not Season of the Witch bad, right?

…. Right?

Give this one a miss. Watch the original one from 1978, or the one from 2018.

 

Midsommar

What was stated about the previous entry simply cannot be said about this one. Written and directed by Ari Aster, the film has all the trademarks of what he has become known for: atmospheric, stylistic, with small, simple camera moves, beautifully composed shots, and a normal scene that is able to morph into horrifying violence and terror in an instant. This is is the movie for fans of the old atmospheric horror/thrillers from the mid-century, such as Rosemary’s Baby or the original Wicker Man

 

Get Out

Another movie by a rising auteur, Get Out is an indictment of modern American race relations disguised as a psychological horror film. The directorial debut of former Key & Peele star Jordan Peele, there is no shortage of creepy atmosphere, with twists and turns throughout. Following the tried and true story arc of meeting the girlfriends parents for the first time, Chris, played by British actor Daniel Kaluuya, tries to navigate the Stepford Wifes-esque reality he has found himself thrown headfirst into.

Watch this if you like a visual story that is carefully constructed, lending itself to many re-watches.

 

No matter what type of movies you decide to watch over the course of this years spooky season, The Comment wishes you plentiful buckets of popcorn and candy to accompany you on your cinematic journey!

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