BSU Confronts Fast Fashion With Art Installation

Walking into the Rondileau Student Union (RSU), you might do a double take. But no, that’s not a pile of dirty laundry (cue residents everywhere running to check their washers). The Aftermath (2021) is a multimedia sculpture that is on loan to BSU until May 17. The huge pile of clothing highlights the impact of textile waste and fast fashion on our climate, something we often forget to consider when browsing for a new look. 

The sculpture is a visual reminder of just how quickly clothing waste piles up, providing facts about fast fashion and suggested methods to advocate. The signage states that each individual piece of clothing in the exhibit represents 30.8 million pounds of waste, for a grand total of 34 billion pounds of textiles that are discarded annually. A documentary detailing the creation process is featured alongside it. 

The Aftermath is the product of the work of several scientists and artists working with The Aftermath Learning Lab out of Boston College.  It was funded by the Boston College (BC) Schiller Institute for Integrated Science and Society and created from clothing collected from the BC community. 

BSU is only the latest stop of The Aftermath’s tour. According to health researcher Dielle Lundberg’s website (diellelundberg.com), a collaborator on the project, the exhibit has previously been featured at Boston University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and the ACCelerate Festival at the Smithsonian Museum of American History. It’s an especially pertinent reminder for college students when outlets like Shein are more popular than ever and cater to a constantly changing trend cycle. The low prices may be tempting for the student on a budget, but the repercussions for our environment may make you want to think twice.   

Students interested in learning more are in luck. There are more resoures available online, including a free course on textile waste (textilewastefacts.com) and a virtual conference scheduled for April 25. On April 18, The Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice is hosting “The Aftermath of Fast Fashion,” a public panel discussion from 4:00-5:30 p.m. in the Dana Mohler Faria auditorium. Two of the project’s creators will be speaking, developmental psychologist Dr. Julia DeVoy and artist Mark Cooper will be in attendance, along with Dr. Laura Steinberg from the Schiller Institute.  A reception will follow. To learn more, visit bit.ly/AftermathBSU.  

Website | + posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related

Come One, Come All: PC’s Annual Carnival

Program Council’s (PC) free Annual Carnival took place on Sunday, April 14th in the Moakley Lot, providing plenty of space for each attraction. This year’s carnival was larger than last year. “The carnival kept falling on rainy days [last year], so we couldn’t do as much,” said Phoebe Wilmot (she/her), Spirit and Traditions Director of […]

The Bridge Unveils 21st Edition at BSU Arts Fest

The 21st edition of The Bridge, Bridgewater State University’s annual literature and arts journal, was unveiled to much anticipation on April 24 at University Park as part of the BSU Arts Fest. The staff of the journal introduced the first, second, and third place prizes for both art and literature, and the winners spoke about […]

AKA’s Upsilon Iota Chapter Fosters Community Leaders

On December 8, 2018, at 6:08 p.m., the Upsilon Iota chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc. (AKA) was chartered on the BSU campus as its first Black Greek organization.  Since then, it has been a space to empower Black female students at BSU and become stand-out members of their communities. The Comment interviewed line sisters […]

SGA To Hold Outreach Event Ahead of Elections

The Student Government Association (SGA) will be hosting a meet and greet in the lead-up to the governing body’s annual elections. The event is to be held on April 1 from 6:00-9:00 p.m. in Burnell Hall room 132A. Students will have the opportunity to meet some of the candidates on the ballot and ask them […]