PRESSURE OF FINALS PUSHES STUDENTS TO ADDERALL

It’s that time of year again. In an attempts to prepare for finals, everyone is busy stocking up on coffee, Red Bulls, and the notoriously enticing Adderall.

While our culture tends to view this prescription medication as the key solution to becoming more intelligent and task efficient, the realities of the matter imply otherwise. Before risking your safety and your criminal record in the pursuit of these pills, there are a few facts you should become aware of.

Despite popular belief, Adderall does not make you smarter. The capacity of an individual to learn or study is not influenced by the presence of a drug. Perhaps for those prescribed to the Adderall find it helpful in refocusing their attention, but it does not make you smarter.

Adderall has been classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a Schedule II substance, which proposes a high risk for dependence, and has caused reported cases of severe psychological and physical dependence. It should also be known, Adderall amongst other Schedule II drugs, is one one the most dangerous licit drugs out there.

If you hadn’t already figured it out, Adderall is an amphetamine. Does that ring a bell? Adderall elicits many of the physiological processes that also occur in those under the influence of cocaine and meth.

Although cocaine and meth are both illicit drugs, they share many similar chemical processes, such as inhibiting the reuptake of neurotransmitters such as dopamine. Do you want to mess with something that shares common effects with drugs such as cocaine?

Making excuses for engaging in Adderall prescription abuse, such as “I only take it when I have to study hard,” is irrelevant and implausible. How can one reason their use, by subjective interpretations of what dosage is considered to be used in moderation, when they have no prescription for it in the first place?

Before illegally purchasing Adderall from your peers, you may also want to evaluate your personal value for honesty and integrity.

Have confidence in your natural ability to acquire information and demonstrate it on cue. You are a perfectly capable human being without the use of drugs.

Christina Fazio is a Comment opinion writer. Email her at cfazio@student.bridgew.edu.

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